4 Job-Related Equations Which Show the Importance of Communication

Posted by Mitzi Branvold | Thursday, July 9, 2020

4 Job-Related Equations Which Show the Importance of Communication

Posted by Mitzi Branvold | Thursday, July 9, 2020

Research shows that doctors who don’t have a good bedside manner get sued more often than doctors who do. It’s not the efficiency of the doctor which matters in this case; it’s the way they communicate with patients. Doctors who take the time to understand what their patients are going through, emotionally and physically, get sued less often. This goes to show that communication skills count for a great deal in any area of life, especially in your business.

Communication = Talking + Listening

Whether you’re running a business or working at a company, it’s important to learn to communicate well. And this means doing both, talking and listening. Many people often argue that listening is the most important component of communication. When you really put in the effort necessary to listen to what a person is going through and sincerely make an effort to solve whatever problems they’re having, they will return the favor by working well for you or with you.

Job Satisfaction = Money + Peace of Mind

The fact is that everyone wants to be recognized and appreciated. Everyone wants praise. And although we might think that money, either in terms of salary or benefits, is most important to a person, this is really not true. Many people opt to work at jobs where they get less money just so that they can have peace of mind. And this usually translates to working for a boss who isn’t constantly hovering or criticizing.

A Good Boss = Soft-Spoken + Understanding

The way in which your boss speaks to you is probably the most important determinant of whether or not you’re happy at your job. This is why someone who speaks in a reasonable tone of voice and who is more understanding is more likely to hold on to an employee than someone who is constantly yelling in the workplace.

Job Dissatisfaction = Tough + Workaholic

We live in a culture where being “tough” and being a “workaholic” are almost lauded as virtues. But the fact is that neither of these qualities can help you to be happier in the long run. Being tough on your employees is likely to take a toll on the employer as well, leading to high blood pressure and heart-related ailments. So do yourself a favor and learn to be more laid back in the workplace.