Motivating Employees Through Work Culture Instead of Salary

Posted by Creatiq Support | Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Motivating Employees Through Work Culture Instead of Salary

Posted by Creatiq Support | Wednesday, January 31, 2018

The topic of motivating employees seems to draw an annoyed response when
brought up. Countless articles and suggestions on how to properly motivate
employees flood the internet. All offering something different, and although it
may be good advice, rarely is it easily taken and applied. Seldom do these
articles talk about human resources and its role in motivating employees. Or
the studies that have been conducted showing what really motivates employees.
Human resource departments set the context and they set the tools to manage
motivation in the workplace. Meaning, line management has to play the role of
motivating individuals, but human resource departments offer those tools in
order for management to play that role. Direct communication with employees
lies in management, thus, motivating an employee does as well. 

“Scientific evidence indicates that the link between compensation,
motivation, and performance is much more complex.”

HR professionals set the general framework for the people who manage within
the organization. If the HR department lacks this general framework, or if
management fails to listen to the framework the system becomes broken. Each
employee is different and requires different techniques in order to motivate
them. However, there are some general things that every employee needs in a
workplace in order for motivation not be cultivated.

Now, let’s talk about that taboo thing called salary. Many believe that
an employees motivation is a direct result of the level of compensation or
salary that person receives. This has been proven to be false on several
occasions. “Scientific
evidence
indicates that the link between compensation, motivation, and
performance is much more complex.” Even if individuals had the option to
choose how much they earn, it still does not guarantee motivation or satisfaction
in their job. Although human resources may have salary guidelines that
management must follow, an employees level of motivation does not come from his
or her salary. Rather it comes from the approach that management has with his
or her employees. Therefore, motivating employees can be summed up in one
concept called work
culture.

“Employees are motivated when the feel appreciated and recognized for
their contributions.”

Work culture is an environment that encompasses trust. Employees are treated
with respect, and not micromanaged. They are entrusted with the companies
values, vision, and mission. This can lead to the concept of thinking and
acting like a business owner. Which means allowing the employee to take
initiative in certain areas while having a place within the company to be
creative and voice ideas and concerns. This shared vision and mutual
communication can enhance employee motivation. 

Lastly, the most important and notable way to create sustained motivation is
to continually recognize contributions and show appreciation. Everyone has a
story of how hard they worked on a project or a sale that was hard to close.
Similarly, most everyone has a story of how a manager did not recognize or show
appreciation towards that difficult task. The feeling one gets when recognition
or appreciation is not shown can completely stifle progression and put an
employee in a bitter state. If left unchecked can ruin that person’s
productivity, or worse, lead a good employee to quit or to be terminated.
Leaders can often underestimate the power of acknowledgment to bring forth
employees best efforts. Employees are motivated when they feel appreciated and
recognized for their contributions. This is the ideal work culture. This brings
us back to the topic of salary and motivation. Studies
have shown
that recognition matters more than money. Therefore, a lack of
money is never a good reason for a lack of motivation in the workplace.