Increased Harassment Prevention Throughout California

Posted by Creatiq Support | Friday, February 1, 2019

Increased Harassment Prevention Throughout California

Posted by Creatiq Support | Friday, February 1, 2019

Beginning January 1, 2019, a new resolution took place in California to help reduce sexual harassment in the workplace. In an effort to help curb harassment and ensure that all employees are educated about exactly what harassment is, what to do about it, and how to avoid it, California has passed a resolution requiring all employers with five or more employees to provide this increased training. 

For supervisors, California now requires two hours of sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention training. This includes managers, supervisors, and any employee who works in a supervisory capacity. For most employers, it will be safer to assign employees to two hours of training if they are unsure of their current position or plan to move into a supervisory position in the near future. 

For employees who aren’t in supervisory positions, California requires one hour of training in sexual harassment and abusive conduct prevention. This training will extend to employees in a variety of job roles, regardless of whether or not they regularly work with other employees or have had interventions concerning their conduct in the past. 

This training must be completed before January 1, 2020. Employers throughout California, therefore, have a full year to ensure that all of their employees are in compliance with these new regulations. 

Training must be completed at least once every two years. Every employee must go through this training regularly to provide them with the best possible understanding of harassment and abusive behavior in the workplace. 

New employees have six months to complete the training. Individuals who are promoted to a supervisory position also have six months to complete the extended training associated with that position. 

This new resolution throughout California is aimed at decreasing sexual harassment for any employee, regardless of race, gender, or other factors. By providing this training, California lawmakers hope to make it easier for employees to understand, report, and take action against harassment.